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finishing up my new book and this particular chapter is about sex. apparently mississippi is the dumbest state. that would concur in the sex chapter because they have the most std's in america. >> mississippi is burning. >> wow. >> bill, ninety 8% of the people sur -- 98% of the people surveyed say the worst state is whatever one you happen to be in at the time. thought? >> i don't like the theme of the show. this study proved the united states of america is like one big new york apartment. we don't know anything about our neighbors and everything we know is completely wrong. i brought this back to new york because we are rude and era gapt. arrogant. >> new york won best sports fans. you can make a case or not. but it also won worst sports fans. the last time i checked boston is not in new york. >> you just proved your point. >> coming up, what is it like to be owned more than anybody else on twitter. first, what is up with the obama's new dog? something impeachable i'm sure. pbjócqkb+ámñt>zyû >> sunny is a portuguese water dog. clearly we must discuss this important news in the -- >
i. once we got past 63 and 64 in saint augustine when the mob turned on the press and in mississippi when people like all good got fired by abc because he would not cover -- abc was still running the story, forgive me, that these three civil rights workers were hiding to get attention and he knew that they had been killed. he lost his job over that. i had to pull nelson at and out of a mob in saint augustine to keep them from being enough. a danish reporter got hit in the camera either by a baseball at and knocked his eye socket out. it was ruthless and brutal for the press. press.s the national the written press never quite believed what they saw. to have press conferences at 9:00 in the morning to say what we were going to do and then the demonstrations would start around 1030 and that 1:00, we would tell them what we did, why we did it, and we would answer questions but they would still -- they could not believe that martin luther king was as , as much of aent selfless man that he actually was. >> in 1961, may 20, when we arrived in montgomery during the freedom ride at the greyho
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just could have made up the rest
the mississippi. >> sort of. >> rose: to memphis, or somewhere. >> well, i can't explain it. this is just music that touched me from the very first moment i heard it. i was very, very young, and i believe it was a willy dixon record, but i'm not sure. but i heard this sound, this sort of wonderful sliver of light broke through between a minor third and a major third-- and i later investigated what that actually means. i didn't even know it at the time. and i just-- it made me shiver. it was almost like an electric shock. and i realized this is where i wanted to live. i wanted to be in that space and hear these sounds and these stories knowing, of course, that i'm monumentally unsuited for the task. you know, i'm not from here. this is not my music. >> rose: before we talk about "house," where did you grow up? >> i grew up in ox horde, england, home of the blues-- it's not the home of the blues. ( laughs (. >> rose: maybe oxford, mississippi. >> yes, i grew up in oxford. >> rose: your dad was-- >> he was a doctor. >> rose: your moment? >> she was-- she raised four children. >> rose: of which you
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
percent. only mississippi had a decline from 9 percent down to 8.5 percent. unemployment fell in 8 states and was unchanged in 14 states. in seattle considering raising their minimum wage to $15 an hour. the state has the heist minimum rate at $9.19 an hour. the mayoral candidates say they will consider this. it may make it more difficult for major rekalers to operate there. wal-mart refused to accept a decision to raise minimum wage to 12.50 an hour. according to a british survey the average officer suffered death raids twice a day computer crashes and rude clients and computer failure. >> the survey found 51 percent of friends experience serial work with aaroning not having a proper time for lunch. they get stressed out over technology malfunctions not surprisingly 42 percent of workers are most wound up and i am patie impatient on a monday. good news, guys, today is tuesday. >>> are you guilty of your own desk rage? tweet us at fox frien foxfriendsfirst@foxnews.com and let us know. >>> it is 10 minutes after the top of the hour. coming up they are supposed to catch you or me if you bre
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> no. i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating carson patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl oldest rookie, 2 years old. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chilo infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a certain in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl. he was shot dead by an fbi tack day cal agent, and this morning, his victim, 16-year-old hannah anderson is to be reunited with her fathe
of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes, no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't even know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we do have some news this morning. coming up. developing story out of michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by allegedly mistreating cancer patients. the feds have raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie. he's 28 years old. after serving time for a crime he didn't commit, brian banks is finally getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story and his attitude is extraordinary. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and in these dog days of summer, you may have seen the infomercials for the items such as the chillow. that's a pillow that keeps your head cool while you sleep. this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products throug
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes. no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating cancer patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this case this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie, he's 28 years old, and after serving times for a crime he did not commit. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, his attitude is great. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chillow infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a search in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
today? -- is a catfish legend in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> 400,000 in one day. >> yes. >> a lot of fish. >> a lot of fish. >> reporter: one of the biggest catfish processors in the country. one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to get it here. critics call that a huge waste of millions of your tax dollars because there is one big problem. you have fda inspecting? >> that's not correct. we have fda all right, a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million for planning the inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we really need usda inspection too? >> there are food safety concerns. >> catfish is a cat fish is a catfish. a safe food. >> reporter: one of the foremost food safety experts, former fda and usda official who says catfish is not a high risk food and fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> certainly isn't public health. the only thing you are lef
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's just doing it for fun and socialization. here to talk about some of the challenges right now are cenk uygur, host of "the young turks" joining us from los angeles and from d.c., bill press, host of the "bill press show." two of the best minds in the business, my friends. i'm honored you can join us tonight. cenk, let me dive in with you first. there has been a lot of speculation about mrs. clinton's potential campaign. w
.s. senate. the answer is seven beginning in 1870 with rebels of mississippi. this year marked the first time that two ochls servafrican-amer simultaneously served in the senate and if cory booker wins next month, two african-americans together in the senate. lee is the winner! send your suggestions at msnbc.com. we will be right back. ♪ you don't have the time to hang around ♪ ♪ [ whimpers ] - hugs from beneful baked delights... - [ barks ] are crispy, oven-baked dog snacks with soft savory centers, made with beef and cheese. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four snacks... to help spark play in your day. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities.. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfect
on the mississippi border. the gunman eventually let one woman go. but the cops say the guy complained to them that he had voices in his head. and blamed his ex-girlfriend's family for inserting some sort of device in his brain he has mad at people. he was mad at people that he said were mean to him. >> mean to him. the standoff went on for nearly 12 hours. when the suspect told negotiators he was planning to kill his remaining hostages, state police stormed the building. investigators say the gunman shot both of the hostages. killed one, wounded the other. and then police shot him dead i mentioned the cartoon he apparently posted on his facebook several days ago. a police negotiator who can't be bothered to save a hostage. investigators say they also found a list of demands in the gunman's bank. the shooter did not want anybody to arrest him or providemental health treatment. competed to see who could give him the best campaign killers. that accusation today from debbie roe the singer's ex-wife and the mother of two of his children paris and prince. debbie roe testified today as part of a law
? where is this trend going? >> we found there's a wide variation in welfare benefits inch mississippi, only 16-$17,000 a year in welfare benefits in a state like hawai'i it was almost $50,000. so that is a pretty good wage if you want to take it that way. >> neil: you know, worries me there's going to be a lot of people listening and watching saying, all the more reason that you double the minimum wage, all the more reason you bring it up to $15 an hour. i would flip it around and say all the more reason you scale back the benefits so they're so general didn't -- generous. >> raiding wages you just increase unemployment. you can't force companies to pay people more than the productivity that's provide. as soon as you start doing that, the companies basically just reduce the amount of labor they have going in. they reduce wages. you're already seeing that, of course, if obamacare. >> neil: welfare was supposed to be temporary in the beginning, supposed to be at a level that wouldn't even have you consider such a move. but between welfare and these other programs that augment and ad --
27th, 1960, we gathered to hear will campbell, a minister who had been run out of oxford, mississippi for playing ping-pong with a black man the day before we had gotten word from the nashville chief of police that anyone involved for the protests would be arrested. there were some rumors that drp the police did not intend to stop. campbell said, you attempt to sit in, the business community, the local officials, and their -- will all put back. they will let police and the rough element in the white community come into the stories and beat you, but it is your decision. they said go home, another man said, go home. another man said, what's the matter? are you chicken? no sooner did we stake our seats at the upstairs common than some young man began attacking the group downstairs. we immediately went down to join our brothers and sisters. violence does beget violence, but the opposite is just as true. spinning itself, pet -- when there's no fear in facing it. obedient subsided. stomping on people, the police conspicuously absent while we were beaten, arrived quickly after the mob wore t
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
, -- another one, holding a town hall this evening in mississippi -- he posts a picture on instagram of the folks coming into that town hall in mississippi. also this evening, john boehner is holding a conference call with republicans. politico reports on that. the headline -- they write the republican leadership hold a conference this evening. topics expected to be discussed include immigration reform legislation, government funding and the debt ceiling, and those issues are expected to be top priorities in the fall. they said conference calls of this nature are typical during long recesses. the house has been out of session for three weeks and does not return to washington until september 9. back to calls. caller: hi. my son is a student going to college. he is going to a private college. my husband and i are both middle-class americans. i am a teacher. the costs are daunting. by the time he is done with school completely, $250,000 in loans. he wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> right. caller: of course you when you talk to move ahead and break those barriers. we get a bill in t
, now until september 3rd. that's the power of german engineering. >>> february 25th, 1870 mississippi became the first ever african-american sworn into the united states senate. revels was elected by the mississippi state legislative the reconstruction era and was only given his seat after a heated debate among senators. "new york times" story from that day. the colored member admitted to his seat in the senate. here's how the "times" described the scene in the senate chamber that day. the ceremony was short. his demeanor was as dignified as to be expected under the circumstances. the abuse poured upon him and during his race over the last two days may have shaken the nerves of anyone. the vast throng in the gallery showed no signs of feeling one way or the other and left very quietly. >>> now, contrast that with the scene in newark this past tuesday night when cory booker came closer to joining the senate with a blowout in the democratic primary. >> it is such an honor to be your nominee, to be your democratic nominee for the united states senate. thank you! >> here's the thing. betw
at the forecast rainfall across the region, across the mississippi river valley and lower ohio valley we could see the potential for heavy rain, special across arkansas an in towards tennessee where we could see 6-12 inches in a very short period of time. still hot, still summertime across the southern plains. 98 in dallas, 98 in shreveport. 98 in houston, what it feels like, it's oppressive. 103 t in houston, 102 in san antonio. they are used this kind of weather. dallas, your forecast average right now is 97 degrees. another day of hundred degree heat and then we'll be slightly below average with some thunderstorms in the forecast. >> gregg: it's beautiful here in new york. it's unbelievable. it's in the 80s. >> spectacular with hardly any humidity. one of those days, we should have called in sick. >> gregg: it's jammed outside on sixth avenue. dominican day parade. great day for it. thanks very much. >> heather: in indonesia meantime, crews are searching for two children after a volcanic eruption, at least six people were killed when lava flowed into a village. the head of disaster agency they
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
we're looking at some heat in texas on into the mid-mississippi river valley. 90s in interior sections of the southwest. some showers making their way from northeast new england on into the ohio valley. monsoonal moisture into the >>> 8:08 only a thursday morning. good morning, i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are warming up nicely. we are at 64 right now in sunnyvale. 61, san jose, 61 to kick off the day in livermore. as we take you through the hour by hour changes, about 77 in livermore, 65 in oakland. so, running about three to five degrees cooler this afternoon. also, you will probably notice less humidity out there, so it feels more true to the temperatures that we are accustomed to here in the bay area this time of year. hold onto those norms as we get into the upcoming weekend. >> and that's your latest weather. matt? >> all right. al, thanks so much. more new of our exclusive conversation with california kidnapping survivor hannah anderson as she speaks out for first time. nbc's national correspondent kate snow is out in san diego. good morning again. >>
built a new peline that feeds the jynt wrb refinery near st. louis across the mississippi river and to the refinery. all they have to do is double up on that pipeline, ship the oil down. might cost more in the long run but who know what is they're paying for land leases to the gulf coast. so it's a way to get around the problem. the right of way is already there. you never hear anybody mention it. host: a couple of international stories for you. from the financial times this morning, host: john from boston, massachusetts. caller: i've been watching for a while, what i've learned about politics is sometimes we have a problem i think in this country it's not so much the country any more it has become love of party. i've been watching and no matter what politician you look at in the united states, no matter state or federal, it's become love of party. and where -- they represent the people.shouldn't they doing the for the people? host: doug from springfield. good morning. caller: good morning. my question would be i appreciate you guys and everything you do. i would like some answe
news channel 12 down in mississippi following the revelations about operation cross country. .his shows improvements needed they know the child sex trafficking response act of 2013 was streamlined data collections and report on sex --fficking by requiring a republican saying that this legislation is intended to improve the ability of caregivers to ensure that children at risk and get help that they require. if you could talk in general terms about what that would do for him. >> this is an issue for us. we estimate about 60% of may be involved in child prostitution's. they may be solicited. it is an issue we are aware of. to make sure that when a kid goes missing a third or fourth or fifth time from these foster homes there is a tendency to not report them. why bother? we need to know when and where they may be going so we can more actively track them and keep them from being alerted to this. >> he talked about some of the john's who use these and crayon these children. start jailing the john's who use child prostitution and putting their faces on page one. is from miramar beach florida
martin is the 14-year-old black belt that was assassinated in the middle of mississippi in 1985 for allegedly violating racial etiquette and speaking to a white woman. his body was placed in the tallahassee river with a 125 lb coffin jindal tied around his neck. it was shown in the jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our dhaka see. we think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from the jail. dr. king says the activism that has gone on the end of the young women and men in that are being addressed it sometimes as eight, naim, 10-years-old are taking the nation back to the democracy that was dug deep by the founding fathers. he was being too kind because the country was founded on racial slavery and it is a conversation that we still have not had. about 50 years ago with the march on washington provided a litmus test for democracy. when he speaks of the march on washington she says americans of all cultures and races have to struggle together and go to jail together to try to funda
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
opportunity. let me conclude with this. generations, if this is 20th-century mississippi -- or 20th-century mali, young people have risked their safety and given their lives to give the -- get the education that has opened their potential. she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear. we want school and education for will child, and we continue the journey to our destination of these and education. nobody can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change to our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service and your commitment, your creativity and courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no more >> to fall through, no more barriers to run into and no more threats to their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. if you want peace, work for justice, it has been said. we know this cuts to the root of if we wantallenge -- justice and peace, we must work for education. thank you so much, and i am happy to take your questions. [applause] >> is that working? mayb
, they have become more eligible. host: the next call is from mississippi. appreciate mrly his comments. however, education starts and home. we have to focus on poor choices. we have all made them. we cannot continue this charade of talking around the mountain. you go through the mountain. you only go through with the word to the wise. focus on the fundamentals. we have to educate children at a young age and raise them properly. then we do not have children having children. we have to stop this in schools. this is not teaching 10 year-old kids in school to pick up the morning after pill. this is not rocket science. it is life or death. i do not worship death. i know the good doctor does not either. besharov.las guest: the challenge with the social programs is to help those in need without generating greater need. that affects every program we have. infects foreign aid. it is a challenge. i wish we could understand a balance has to be drawn. we do not seem to be doing that. host: the programs were heavy on because- dairy republican dairy farmers wanted government regulation to force sell
:00 eastern time, 6:00 local time. robert is joining us, oxford, mississippi, independent line. turning back to the situation in egypt, 421 dead. your thoughts. caller: i want to throw in after hearing dave from texas, but i lived in cairo this past fall as a student. i wanted to say that the completelyere are spotless in comparison to the politics here. in regards to deception of the public, deception of the western media. a few minutesller ago, i have to agree with him, the muslim brotherhood is definitely trying to turn the western eye against the military. from what i can see when i was there, the reason -- there are a lot of deaths now, the muslim brotherhood are using force and are dying because of it because the military are defending themselves, but their were much fewer deaths earlier last fall because there protesters wanted democracy and there were peaceful process. the muslim brotherhood was using force. it looks bad for the military. that is my opinion. host: two were for the call. "usa today: egypt iraq than chaos. "washington times," one us in our generals to cairo? bestca's t
to egypt. gary, greenville, mississippi, republican. good morning. gary, are you there? caller: i am. host: go ahead, sir. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i don't understand how some report the current administration in egypt because they were elected by the people. and we the american people, we supported their election. i mean, even john mccain who's a celebrated veteran said that this is a coo there. so i'm not so much for or against anything, but i think when americans call your show that we should understand that we supported this democratic effort that took place in egypt. and we should consider those things before we get on here talking negatively or positively about the subject. but i just don't understand how e're so kind of shallow in our support for the previous administration in egypt because again, they were duly elected by the people and then secondly as i mentioned before, one of the most celebrated veterans in this nation, senator mccain went there. he visited, so on and so forth, and he said that the -- that it was a coo. so that's just my thoughts. hos
of your competitors are holding strong. host: gulfport, mississippi, steve on our republican line. caller: i just wanted to make a couple of comments. one, i'm happy that the department of justice is trying to keep this merger from occurring. but the biggest problem that the airline industry has is that they have terrible, horrible customer service. they ou pay for a ticket, do not guarantee the plane will take off on time, they don't guarantee the plane will arrive on time, and if you happen to be landing in an airport where you have to switch from one airplane to another airplane, they don't even guarantee that they'll land on time and give you now time to get to the second departure or second leg of your trip on to your destination. the biggest problem the airline industry has is a total lack of customer service or customer concern, and that is why there aren't as many people flying as there should be, and that is why they are now charging for things like a bag, ok, if you bring a bag with you, they now charge you for that, and they're nick and he will diming everybody to death, if you
.s. in the military yesterday. mississippi, democratic caller. your message to congress? take healtheed to care way from congress. they are making $70 per hour and they will not even raise the minimum wage. most of america are too stupid to realize they're voting against their own interests by not voting health care for themselves. have a nice day. host: sue, your message to congress? caller: i want to be at your health care plan, congress. host: what do you think should be done about the health care law? host: if they vote it in for us, they should be under the same health care. host: do you think should be defunded? caller: yes, i do. host: have you send that message to a member of congress? caller: i have not. host of the to attend a town hall meeting? caller: yes, i have. --t: who is did you go to whose did you go to? caller: ron paul. host: when was that? m, when he was running last time? host: thank you. next caller. caller tell my message to them is -- caller: my message to them is that obama care is coming in with -- medicare was here before obama care. if we take money at of this out of th
is the critical year. realignment wouldn't have happened if not for the 1930s -- >> -- got 87% in mississippi -- >> and eisenhower got a stronger share of the southern vote. >> we could talk about it off camera. listen, "the national review" cover story, "why like ike." thank you very much. cokie, thank you, have a great weekend. tomorrow, david axelrod will be here on set and we'll talk to reverend al sharpton and martin luther king iii ahead of the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. ahead this morning, the official director of the consumer financial protection bureau. it's official, richard cordray in his first television interview since his confirmation. the incredible 911 call from that school shooting outside of atlanta. how a level headed school employee may have single-handedly prevented tragedy. when we come back. the secret is out. hydration is in. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. >>> good morning, everybody. 8:00 a
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